On this day 1960: P.G. Wodehouse didn’t turn 80.

P.G Wodehouse was born on 15 October 1881, in Guildford, England. It's a fact you're probably aware of already, as the social media machine churns out OTD (On This Day) tributes in an attempt to generate content to the masses. This doesn't bother me per se. I like social media, I like history, and there …

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Do Not Hate In The Plural

An excellent piece from Nourishncherish, who is always sound on Wodehouse.

Enjoy!

HP

Nourish-n-Cherish

I was reading a short story by P.G.Wodehouse on the train. These are the times when I most mistaken for a lunatic. My seat shudders with unconcealed mirth. I giggle, laugh and sometimes wipe away tears of laughter, while the world is going about the stern business of earning a living. He is one of my favorite authors, and after every few books that makes me mope around the world pondering on the wretchedness and seriousness of life, I turn to a P.G.W book to remind myself that tomfoolery is a virtue to be exalted and celebrated. His turn of phrase, his romping joy, is enough to set me straight.

When I read his autobiography ‘Over Seventy’ a few years ago, I could see that the septuagenarian viewed his own life pretty much the same way he came across in his writing: Sunny and delightful. In his own words, he…

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On this day: George Orwell, who wrote in Defence of P.G. Wodehouse, was born (1903)

George Orwell was born on this day 1903. Best known as the author of dystopian classics 1984 and Animal Farm, Orwell also wrote a 1946 essay 'In Defence of P.G. Wodehouse'. The background to this story has been covered in much detail elsewhere.* Before the start of the Second World War, P.G. Wodehouse was living …

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PG Wodehouse 1958 interview

PG Wodehouse First broadcast: 26 October 1958 Starting with footage of PG Wodehouse at home in the Hamptons on New York's Long Island, this interview shows the author at his genial and self-deprecating best. Wodehouse cheerfully discusses his long writing career, his eschewal of 'serious' fiction and the lack of sex in his books. via …

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The Code of the Woosters: PG Wodehouse’s guide to fighting fascism (The Guardian)

This article by Sam Jordison appeared online at The Guardian today: The Code of the Woosters: PG Wodehouse's guide to fighting fascism | Books | The Guardian In many respects it's a welcome move in the right direction, away from the usual misinformation and conjecture about Wodehouse's wartime experience. Sam Jordison is right to point out …

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Wodehouse misremembered

Bestsellers: Popular Fiction Since 1900 (2002) by Clive Bloom In many respects, Clive Bloom's 'Bestsellers' is an excellent book that I would recommend to anyone with an interest in the history of publishing, reading, and the emergence of 'the bestseller' in the twentieth century. Happily for me, Bloom also chooses some of my favourite authors …

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The Wipers Times (and Wodehouse?)

In my earlier piece, ‘Suffering from Cheerfulness’, I suggested that Wodehouse’s infamous radio broadcasts should be considered as part of a wider tradition of British humour in the face of adversity, particularly during wartime. My inspiration for writing was a volume of selected pieces from The Wipers Times. So I was delighted to discover another piece on this subject at the excellent blog: ‘Great War Fiction’. This one considers the possible influence of Wodehouse on the Wipers Times.

HP

Great War Fiction

Next week on BBC TV there’s a promising-looking film about The Wipers Times. Ian Hislop and Nick Newman are the authors.

It will tell the story of how they found a printing press under the blasted ramparts of Ypres, and put it to use to create a very witty paper.  I Like Newman’s comments on the aim of the film:

I imagine viewers might be expecting to see a tragic tale of lives lost in a futile war, and we’ve had a lot of films like that and some of them are very, very good. But this is another side to this story of the First World War, and I think it’s a particularly British thing that we tend to laugh in adversity and this is about the triumph of the human spirit in adversity. It shows how a group of men managed to survive the First World War…

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No Poohs is good Poohs

Shortly before my daughter was born, I announced to family members and other well-wishers (who might otherwise have gathered at the crib festooned with Disney merchandise) a ban on Winnie-the-Pooh. No Pooh toys. No Pooh dancing on the wall. No Pooh on the bedding (at least not of Milne's making). My stance shocked and appalled …

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Suffering from cheerfulness

ARE YOU A VICTIM TO OPTIMISM? YOU DON'T KNOW? THEN ASK YOURSELF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. 1. DO YOU SUFFER FROM CHEERFULNESS? 2. DO YOU WAKE UP IN THE MORNING FEELING THAT ALL IS GOING WELL FOR THE ALLIES? 3. DO YOU SOMETIMES THINK THAT THE WAR WILL END WITHIN THE NEXT TWELVE MONTHS? 4. DO …

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