Was P. G. Wodehouse squeamish about sex?

Yesterday, I pondered the rather baffling discovery that some of Wodehouse’s male characters have been named literary sex symbols. This subject can hardly be taken seriously. As the critic Emsworth notes, sex was never allowed to creep into Wodehouse’s world.

HP

EMSWORTH

We don’t mean this in a negative way, but the fact can’t be avoided: the Master wasn’t comfortable with sex. Not once in dozens of comic novels and hundreds of short stories with romantic plots, does any P. G. Wodehouse character indulge in the carnal passions, on-stage or off.  Considering that people probably joke about sex more than anything else, it’s almost astonishing how well Wodehouse got by as a comic writer without it.

Wodehouse wasn’t prudish in other respects. Bertie Wooster and his fellow Drones drink themselves silly, commit petty burglaries, fritter money away at casinos, resort to blackmail at the drop of a hat, and concoct hilarious frauds. And as the twentieth century wore on and the rules against explicit language in literature relaxed, so, in a modest way, did Wodehouse’s vocabulary. An occasional “hell” and “damn” sometimes crept in, and in The Mating Season (1950) characters use…

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Wodehouse’s men: objects of desire

I'd like to take a short break from my series exploring Wodehouse on Women  to share a remarkable piece entitled 111 Male Characters Of British Literature, In Order Of Bangability by Carrie Frye, in which Ms Frye lists 111 fictional characters she finds sexually desirable enough to take to her bed. Almost as astonishing as …

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Wodehouse on women: Bachelors Anonymous

Last week, I began a series exploring 'Wodehouse on Women' in response to criticism of Indian Summer of an Uncle by Janet Cameron. In Part 1, I opened the case for the defence by demonstrating that Wodehouse did not specifically exclude women as complex characters in his work. One Wodehouse expert has added further evidence, …

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Wodehouse on Women: the case for the defence

P.G. Wodehouse has occasionally been criticised, along with other male writers of his era, for his portrayal of women. As a female reader with feminist views, the diversity and strength of Wodehouse's female characters is something I particularly enjoy. Subsequently, I find the criticism rather baffling. In order to better understand and unravel some of …

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The desert island pickings of a quadragenarian

Henry glanced hastily at the mirror. Yes, he did look rather old. He must have overdone some of the lines on his forehead. He looked something between a youngish centenarian and a nonagenarian who had seen a good deal of trouble. The Man with Two Left Feet (1917) I feel much like Henry did, as …

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Watching the Birds

After my recent piece in defence of Aunt's Aren't Gentlemen (aka The Cat Nappers) I was compelled to read it again - and found it ripe with good stuff. ... his idea of a good time was to go off with a pair of binoculars and watch birds, a thing that never appealed to me. …

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Movember and the psychology of the upper lip

Today's men and women are bewilderingly well informed on matters of sex, relationships and fashion. But our sources are silent on the subject of character. Indeed, the notion of character seems to have shifted from something everybody had, for better or worse, to a questionable distinction to be hushed-up wherever possible. That is until the …

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