P.G. Wodehouse: P.I. Writer

‘The effect on her of a dark, keen-eyed man like Adrian Mulliner, who spoke well and easily of footprints, psychology and the underworld, must have been stupendous.’

‘The Smile That Wins’ (Mulliner Nights)

Great piece on Private Investigators in P.G. Wodehouse’s writing from The New Thrilling Detective blog.

The New Thrilling Detective Web Site

By Rudyard Kennedy

“Consider the case of Henry Pifield Rice… I must explain Henry early, to avoid disappointment. If I simply said he was a detective, and let it go at that, I should be obtaining the reader’s interest under false pretences. He was really only a sort of detective, a species of sleuth. At Stafford’s International Investigation Bureau, in the Strand, where he was employed, they did not require him to solve mysteries which had baffled the police. He had never measured a footprint in his life, and what he did not know about bloodstains would have filled a library.”
— a typical Wodehouse sleuth, in “Bill the Bloodhound”

 

P.G. Wodehouse (1881-1975) wrote nearly 100 books, almost all of them comic novels. He’s best known, of course, for creating Jeeves, the ultimate valet (or as he would have it, the ultimate “gentleman’s gentleman”), as well as other memorable figures…

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P.G. Wodehouse Reference Guide for Political Commentary

The name P.G. Wodehouse is seeing a resurgence in the somewhat unlikely arena of online political commentary, particularly in Britain.  This puts some people -- those who’ve never read any Wodehouse, but seem determined to lug him into the row -- at a disadvantage. So I’ve put together this handy reference guide to help anyone …

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Happy P.G. Wodehouse Day!

What Ho, and Happy P.G. Wodehouse Day everyone! That’s what I’m calling Valentine’s Day this year. And why not? It’s a good day for it. Saint Valentine can’t expect all the attention for himself. Nor can he bally well object -- as the Patron Saint of affianced couples, love, and marriage -- to us celebrating …

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Win a copy of new Wodehouse release, ‘Highballs for Breakfast’

There are moments when one needs a drink. Are there moments, indeed, when one doesn’t?’ Barmy in Wonderland (1952) I’m excited to offer Plumtopia readers the chance to win a copy of the new PG Wodehouse release, Highballs for Breakfast, courtesy of Penguin Random House. To enter, simply reply by comment to this post telling …

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The birth of P.G. Wodehouse and Sherlock Holmes

PGW quoted this famous character from his third book up to his ninety-third and had a tremendous admiration for Arthur Conan Doyle. N.T.P. Murphy, A Wodehouse Handbook On the 15th of October, 1881, P.G. Wodehouse was born in Guildford , England. Coincidentally, 1881 was also the year in which Dr. John Watson first met Sherlock …

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What do Wodehouse lovers read when not reading Wodehouse?

“You are evidently fond of mystery plays.” “I love them.” “So do I. And mystery novels?” “Oh, yes!” “Have you read Blood on the Banisters?” “Oh, yes! I thought it was much better than Severed Throats.” “So did I,” said Cyril. “Much better. Brighter murders, subtler detectives, crisper clues … better in every way.” The …

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A matter of style: Wodehouse and the modern rules of writing.

"I am no stranger to butterfly belly. A man who has had to pass himself off as Gussie Fink-Nottle to four aunts in a chilly Hampshire dining room with only orange juice in the carburettor knows the meaning of fear." Jeeves and the Wedding Bells Sebastian Faulks presumably knows the feeling pretty well too. As …

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Cocktail Time

There had fallen upon the bar-parlour of the Anglers' Rest one of those soothing silences which from time to time punctuate the nightly feasts of Reason and flows of Soul in that cosy resort. It was broken by a Whiskey and Splash. "I've been thinking a lot," said the Whiskey and Splash... Cats will Be …

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Cats Will Be Cats

The struggle between Prater's cat and Prater's cat's conscience was short, and ended in the hollowest of victories for the former. The conscience really had no sort of chance from the beginning. The Tabby Terror (1902) published in Tales of St Austin's (1903) P.G. Wodehouse and his wife Ethel were devoted animal lovers who donated …

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