P.G. Wodehouse Reference Guide for Political Commentary

The name P.G. Wodehouse is seeing a resurgence in the somewhat unlikely arena of online political commentary, particularly in Britain.  This puts some people -- those who’ve never read any Wodehouse, but seem determined to lug him into the row -- at a disadvantage. So I’ve put together this handy reference guide to help anyone …

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Money in the Bank (review by John Lagrue)

John Lagrue's timely review of P.G. Wodehouse's Money in the Bank (1942) touches on another great Wodehouse romance --that of Anne Benedick and Jeff Miller. John also proposes Anne Benedick as Wodehouse's finest heroine. It's a proposal worth taking seriously from a Wodehouse lover of John's calibre. I certainly recall Anne being a good egg, but I've never …

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2016 Reading Challenge: Money in the Bank (a book guaranteed to bring you joy)

I do hope you enjoy this review of Money in the Bank (1942).

You might read this book under the 2016 Reading Challenge category of ‘a book guaranteed to bring you joy’.

2016 MINI READING CHALLENGE
There are many different reading challenges you can try, the idea being to read a book in each category listed. Popular examples include:

My mini Wodehouse challenge is to fit a book by P.G. Wodehouse into one of these challenge categories. There is even a modest prize up for grabs, if you care to post a comment to the original challenge page below, telling us which book you read and the reading challenge category.

You don’t have to be actively participating in any other challenge to enter.  For details and to enter, visit: The 2016 Mini Reading Challenge: include a book by P.G. Wodehouse .

Happy reading!

HP

The Aroma of Books

Oh Wodehouse, how I love thee!

md8481236382 //published 1942//

Even when I think I’m not in the mood for a Wodehouse, it turns out that I’m in the mood for a Wodehouse.  Money in the Bank was next in the TBR stack, so even though I wasn’t 100% feeling it, I decided to pick it up anyway, and I was hooked by the bottom of page one, when I read –

You would have said [Mr. Shoesmith] was not in sympathy with Jeff, and you would have been right.  Jeff had his little circle of admirers, but Mr. Shoesmith was not a member of it.  About the nastiest jolt of the well-known solicitor’s experience had been the one he had received on the occasion, some weeks previously, when his only daughter had brought this young man home and laid him on the mat, announcing in her authoritative way that they…

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Honoria presents the prizes: ‘Fatty O’Leary’s Dinner Party’ competition

Having taken the obligatory swigs of orange juice, it gives me great pleasure to announce the prize winner of the 'Fatty O'Leary's Dinner Party' competition. Judging was more difficult than expected. I'm only sorry there aren't enough prizes to go around. The entries deserves some discussion, beginning with Sally -- what a wonderful name for …

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A matter of style: Wodehouse and the modern rules of writing.

"I am no stranger to butterfly belly. A man who has had to pass himself off as Gussie Fink-Nottle to four aunts in a chilly Hampshire dining room with only orange juice in the carburettor knows the meaning of fear." Jeeves and the Wedding Bells Sebastian Faulks presumably knows the feeling pretty well too. As …

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