Highballs for breakfast: The very best of P.G. Wodehouse on the joys of a good stiff drink

Highballs for Breakfast is a new compilation of P.G. Wodehouse’s writing on the subject of liquor, drinking, Dutch Courage and mornings after, compiled and edited by Richard T. Kelly. It’s a well-researched collection that delves widely into the Wodehouse canon, unearthing plenty of treasures on the subject. ‘…Have you ever tasted a mint-julep, Beach?’ ‘Not …

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I have dyspepsia!

Yesterday I received the Doctor's diagnosis of an ailment that has been troubling me for some time. I have dyspepsia! I don't suppose a doctor ever received such a joyous response to this news as mine did. I practically whooped around the surgery. For now, I can read my favourite poem, by Lancelot Mulliner in …

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P.G. Wodehouse in Bath: The Loafing Years

It is not unreasonable to assume that when the assorted dignitaries of Bath bunged off their application for UNESCO World Heritage listing, the fact that P.G. Wodehouse lived here as a boy was pretty high up on their list of reasons. No doubt it weighed heavily with the judges. And yet, in all the historical …

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Wodehouse poets: I have got dyspepsia

In approximately 25 minutes, I will be heading off to explore P.G. Wodehouse locations in Shropshire, on route to the wedding of a Wodehouse lover called Bill. To mark the occasion, I'd like to share my favourite 'Wodehouse' poem -- presented as the work of Lancelot Mulliner in 'Came the Dawn'. I wanted this to …

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Honeysuckle Cottage by Wodehouse: an antidote to Valentine slush and nonsense

He held rigid views on the art of the novel, and always maintained that an artist with a true reverence for his craft should not decend to goo-ey love stories, but should stick austerely to revolvers, cries in the night, missing papers, mysterious Chinamen, and dead bodies -- with or without gash in throat. From …

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The Truth About George

I asked my eight year old daughter to share her favourite Wodehouse romance and, after much umming and ahhhhing, she chose 'The Truth About George'. In this short story (from Meet Mr. Mulliner) Mr Mulliner recounts the ordeal of his nephew George Mulliner, who must overcome his stammer in order to declare his love for Susan …

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Meet Mr. Mulliner

A review of Meet Mr Mulliner by ‘The Grand Reviewer’

The Grand Reviewer

Meet Mr. Mulliner, a local fisherman and popular visitor of the pub, the Angler’s Rest, where he shares the almost unbelievable escapades of various members of the Mulliner family tree. From George the stammerer, who overcomes his stammer so he can marry the crossword-loving love of his life, to Augustine the curate, who after drinking some Buck-U-Uppo becomes a fearless aid to a bishop, to James the author, who finds his bachelorhood threatened by the sappy romance of his aunt’s novels, each tale in the collection shows how the Mulliners face adversity in the most ridiculous of situations and overcome it in the most convenient of coincidences.

Meet Mr. Mulliner is authored by P.G. Wodehouse, who most people recognize for his stories about Jeeves and Wooster (Jeeves being the inspiration behind askjeeves.com). Wodehouse’s writing style truly defines the book. He makes it fun to read the tales of the Mulliners…

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Meeting Mulliners

   Two men were sitting in the bar-parlour of the Anglers' Rest as I entered it; and one of them, I gathered from his low, excited voice and wide gestures, was telling the other a story. I could hear nothing but an occasional 'Biggest I ever saw in my life!' and 'Fully as large as …

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