Wodehouse quotes for every occasion: Aunt and Uncle Day

“That was Pongo Twistleton. He’s all broken up about his Uncle Fred." “Dead?” “No such luck. Coming up to London again tomorrow. Pongo had a wire this morning.” P.G. Wodehouse – Uncle Fred Flits By 26 July is Aunt and Uncle Day apparently. The nub of the thing, I gather, is to commemorate the wonderful …

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P.G. Wodehouse reading list: the Jeeves and Wooster stories

This piece follows my reading suggestions for new Wodehouse readers with a reading list for the Jeeves and Wooster stories. Jeeves and Wooster Reading List The Inimitable Jeeves (1923)* Carry On, Jeeves (1925)* Very Good Jeeves (1930)* Right Ho, Jeeves (1934; US title Brinkley Manor) The Code of the Woosters (1938) Joy in the Morning …

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Happy New Year: Snifters with Ukridge at the Coal Hole

N.T.P. Murphy identifies the Coal Hole in The Strand (in A Wodehouse Handbook, Volume One ) as one of four remaining London pubs mentioned in Wodehouse’s writing. It is mentioned in ‘The Debut of Battling Billson’, after long-suffering narrator James Corcoran meets Ukridge at the Gaiety Theatre. ‘Hallo, laddie!’ said Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, genially. ‘When …

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Jeeves & Wooster centenary: Extricating Young Gussie

Hot on the heels of the Blandings centenary in June comes the 100th anniversary of P.G. Wodehouse's Bertie Wooster and Reginald Jeeves. The characters first appeared together in the story 'Extricating Young Gussie', published in September 1915 in the Saturday Evening Post. The centenary has been commemorated with a flurry of articles (try What ho! Celebrating …

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Wodehouse’s men: objects of desire

I'd like to take a short break from my series exploring Wodehouse on Women  to share a remarkable piece entitled 111 Male Characters Of British Literature, In Order Of Bangability by Carrie Frye, in which Ms Frye lists 111 fictional characters she finds sexually desirable enough to take to her bed. Almost as astonishing as …

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