Delightful Characters of the Feline kind in Plumsville

There is always something fun going on at Ashokbhatia’s blog. This is one of my favourites.

ashokbhatia

We live in times when the only feline creatures we happen to know are from the realm of cat-toons. We knowPGW Doraemon Doraemon, Felix, Garfield, Tom and Top Cat, to name just a few. Their eccentricities we adore. Their haughtiness we endure. Their ingenuity makes our spirits soar. Their ruthless manner in handling mice of all kinds we ignore. To put it simply, in a world dominated by TV and internet, they have become a part of folklore.

Now, one does not mean to offend any of these personalities whose intrinsic felineness is rather unmistakable. But there are several others from the realm of literature who are no less admirable. They were born in times when the printed word was ruling the roost. They have left an indelible impression on the minds and psyches of several generations. They have exemplified the traits of bosses and the bossed-over alike. Surely, once in…

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‘Goodbye to All Cats’

Wodehouse with catI am looking forward to reading George Simmers’ chapter on Wodehouse and the Great War. For now though, here is what he has to say on the subject of cats.

Great War Fiction

I’ve written a chapter for a forthcoming collection of critical essays on P. G. Wodehouse. (I’ll be sure to relay full information here when there is firm news about publication date and details.)

My piece is on Wodehouse and the Great War – which might sound to some people like one of those thesis subjects imagined by parodists of academia, like ‘Jane Austen and the French Revolution’ , but looking at Wodehouse in relation to the War really does reveal some quite interesting things about his early work, and his attitude to his writing . I think so, anyway.

The publisher’s reader seems fairly happy with my chapter, too, but sent one little note. Did I know ‘Goodbye to All Cats?’

I didn’t, but the echo of Graves in the title had me interested. A bit of quick research revealed that this was a story in the 1936 collection Young…

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Introducing Monty

I did wonder whether or not to introduce our new cat to you, even if he is to be called Monty in honour of Wodehouse's Monty Bodkin. After all, you're here to immerse yourself in all things Wodehouse, not read about the family pet. But then I was flicking through Richard Usborne's After Hours With …

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Watching the Birds

After my recent piece in defence of Aunt's Aren't Gentlemen (aka The Cat Nappers) I was compelled to read it again - and found it ripe with good stuff. ... his idea of a good time was to go off with a pair of binoculars and watch birds, a thing that never appealed to me. …

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Cats Will Be Cats

The struggle between Prater's cat and Prater's cat's conscience was short, and ended in the hollowest of victories for the former. The conscience really had no sort of chance from the beginning. The Tabby Terror (1902) published in Tales of St Austin's (1903) P.G. Wodehouse and his wife Ethel were devoted animal lovers who donated …

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