P.G. Wodehouse reading list: the Jeeves and Wooster stories

This piece follows my reading suggestions for new Wodehouse readers with a reading list for the Jeeves and Wooster stories. Jeeves and Wooster Reading List The Inimitable Jeeves (1923)* Carry On, Jeeves (1925)* Very Good Jeeves (1930)* Right Ho, Jeeves (1934; US title Brinkley Manor) The Code of the Woosters (1938) Joy in the Morning …

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Introducing Jeeves: saviour or snake?

Meet Jeeves, the world's most famous valet and P.G. Wodehouse's best known character. The name Jeeves has come to symbolise the epitome of efficient service to millions who've never even read Wodehouse. Among fans, he is spoken of with a reverence usually reserved for deities. And how many of us have wished for a Jeeves …

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The romances of Bingo Little: Honoria Glossop

'The only one of the family I really know is the girl.' I had hardly spoken these words when the most extraordinary change came over young Bingo's face. His eyes bulged, his cheeks flushed, and his Adam's apple hopped about like one of those india-rubber balls on the top of the fountain in a shooting …

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Getting started with Bertie and Jeeves: a chronological challenge

New Wodehouse readers sometimes ask which of the Jeeves stories they should read first. Opinion on the matter is divided; some people recommend 'Carry On, Jeeves' (1925) whereas I suggest 'The Inimitable Jeeves' (1923). Both are excellent. The question is a matter of chronology.  This piece explores these starting points in more detail. Readers looking for …

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Eggs! Eggs! Damn all eggs!

This Lord Worplesdon was Florence's father. He was the old buster who, a few years later, came down to breakfast one morning, lifted the first cover he saw, said 'Eggs! Eggs! Damn all eggs!' in an overwrought sort of voice, and instantly legged it for France, never to return to the bosom of the family. …

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The four seasons of Wodehouse

Reading this marvellous line in Carry on Jeeves:

‘It was one of those still evenings you get in the summer, when you can hear a snail clear its throat a mile away.’ (in Jeeves Takes Charge)

reminded me of this previous piece on Wodehouse through the seasons.

Plumtopia

1939 Uncle Fred in the SpringtimeIt is commonly understood that, far from representing a bygone age, P.G. Wodehouse created an  idealised England that never really existed. Personally, I remain determined to find fragments of Wodehouse in reallife, and last October I immigrated to England in search of Plumtopia.

I arrived in time for a glorious Autumn –  my favourite season. Surprisingly, Wodehouse sets only one novel in Autumn (that I can recall).

I reached out a hand from under the blankets, and rang the bell for Jeeves.
‘Good evening, Jeeves,’
‘Good morning, sir’
This surprised me.
‘Is it morning?’
‘Yes, sir.’
‘Are you sure? It seems very dark outside.’
‘There is a fog, sir. If you will recollect, we are now in Autumn – season of mists and mellow fruitfulness.’
‘Season of what?’
‘Mists, sir, and mellow fruitfulness.’

The Code of the Woosters (1938)

Autumn 2012 in Berskhire

After a stunning Autumn – mellow and…

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Watching the Birds

After my recent piece in defence of Aunt's Aren't Gentlemen (aka The Cat Nappers) I was compelled to read it again - and found it ripe with good stuff. ... his idea of a good time was to go off with a pair of binoculars and watch birds, a thing that never appealed to me. …

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