Six reasons why P.G. Wodehouse is Stephen Fry’s hero

If I were to construct a Plumtopian society according to my own specifications (which, regrettably, nobody has asked me to do) BBC Radio 4 would be one of the first things I'd bung into the package. In addition to producing high quality radio, the Radio 4 website is also well worth exploring. It contains, among …

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Where Jeeves meets a hard-boiled detective: P.G. Wodehouse and Raymond Chandler

One prefers, of course, on all occasions to be stainless and above reproach, but, failing that, the next best thing is unquestionably to have got rid of the body. P.G. Wodehouse (Joy in the Morning) Raymond Chandler was born on this day, 23 July 1888. Chandler wrote 'hard-boiled' detective fiction, including classics like The Big …

Continue reading Where Jeeves meets a hard-boiled detective: P.G. Wodehouse and Raymond Chandler

Agatha Christie’s Hallowe’en Party for P.G. Wodehouse

Agatha Christie’s novel Hallowe’en Party, the 39th outing for Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, was first published In November 1969. Christie dedicated it: To P. G. Wodehouse — whose books and stories have brightened my life for many years. Also, to show my pleasure in his having been kind enough to tell me he enjoyed my …

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Writing under the influence of Wodehouse: A Blindefellows Chronicle by Auriel Roe

P.G. Wodehouse offers us so much as readers, but he's an inspiration for writers too. I asked Auriel Roe, author of A Blindfellows Chronicle, about Wodehouse's influence on her writing. How did you discover Wodehouse? Probably the Richard Briers and Michael Hordern radio version of Jeeves and Wooster. Dickens always intended his work to be read …

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On this day: George Orwell, who wrote in Defence of P.G. Wodehouse, was born (1903)

George Orwell was born on this day 1903. Best known as the author of dystopian classics 1984 and Animal Farm, Orwell also wrote a 1946 essay 'In Defence of P.G. Wodehouse'. The background to this story has been covered in much detail elsewhere.* Before the start of the Second World War, P.G. Wodehouse was living …

Continue reading On this day: George Orwell, who wrote in Defence of P.G. Wodehouse, was born (1903)

Highballs for breakfast: The very best of P.G. Wodehouse on the joys of a good stiff drink

Highballs for Breakfast is a new compilation of P.G. Wodehouse’s writing on the subject of liquor, drinking, Dutch Courage and mornings after, compiled and edited by Richard T. Kelly. It’s a well-researched collection that delves widely into the Wodehouse canon, unearthing plenty of treasures on the subject. ‘…Have you ever tasted a mint-julep, Beach?’ ‘Not …

Continue reading Highballs for breakfast: The very best of P.G. Wodehouse on the joys of a good stiff drink

Raising a glass – to Norman Murphy!

Most Wodehouse enthusiasts will now be aware of the sad news that Lt Col Norman Murphy, founder Chairman of the PG Wodehouse Society (UK), passed away in October. As the PG Wodehouse Society’s Remembrancer, Norman was generous with his time and expert knowledge, and he leaves behind a body of work that Wodehouse enthusiasts will …

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The birth of P.G. Wodehouse and Sherlock Holmes

PGW quoted this famous character from his third book up to his ninety-third and had a tremendous admiration for Arthur Conan Doyle. N.T.P. Murphy, A Wodehouse Handbook On the 15th of October, 1881, P.G. Wodehouse was born in Guildford , England. Coincidentally, 1881 was also the year in which Dr. John Watson first met Sherlock …

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Five more favourite writers of Wodehouse readers

Hot on the heels of yesterday’s top five, this piece completes the top ten list of authors endorsed by Wodehouse readers. Some surprises, I thought. Since writing this piece, I have read a good deal of Saki and am grateful to have ‘discovered’ his stuff via Wodehouse lovers.

Plumtopia

In my last piece, I revealed the top top five authors Wodehouse lovers in the ‘Fans of P G Wodehouse’ Facebook community named as their favourites (when not reading Wodehouse). No doubt you’re itching to know who else our Plum chums love to read, so I’m here to share the next five most popular authors named. As these five were almost equally popular, I’ve listed them chronologically.

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Charles Dickens (b. 1812)

‘She dotes on poetry, sir. She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself, sir. You may have met with her ‘Ode to an Expiring Frog,’ sir.” ‘

Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers

Dickens has both fans and detractors among our Wodehouse loving fraternity. As someone who reads for escapist pleasure, I sympathise with those who avoid…

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What do Wodehouse lovers read when not reading Wodehouse?

What Ho! What Ho!

In my recent talk at the Psmith in Pseattle convention, I touched on the subject of what the modern Wodehouse reader is reading. As promised, I am ‘reblogging’ my original post on the subject. I will also share the two follow-up pieces which reveal the full list.

Happy reading!

Honoria

Plumtopia

“You are evidently fond of mystery plays.”

“I love them.”

“So do I. And mystery novels?”

“Oh, yes!”

“Have you read Blood on the Banisters?”

“Oh, yes! I thought it was much better than Severed Throats.”

“So did I,” said Cyril. “Much better. Brighter murders, subtler detectives, crisper clues … better in every way.”

The two twin souls gazed into each other’s eyes. There is no surer foundation for a beautiful friendship than a mutual taste in literature.

P G Wodehouse (‘Strychnine in the Soup’ in Mulliner Nights)

I recently asked the ‘Fans of P G Wodehouse’ Facebook community about their favourite authors – who they like to read when not curled up with Plum’s latest. The response was a staggering 370 comments (and counting) listing over 250 different authors. I’ve collated the replies and can now reveal the top 50 authors these Wodehouse lovers named as…

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