2016 Reading Challenge: French Leave (A book set in Europe)

9200000009531256Here we are, young, ardent idealistic, yearning for life and love and laughter, and what do we get? Eggs.’

French Leave (1956)

Earlier this year, you may recall, I proposed a mini reading challenge . The challenge is to include a book by P.G. Wodehouse in your reading, under one of the categories listed in any other 2016 Reading Challenge.

Stefan Nilsson suggested The Code of the Woosters  for the ’20th Century Classic’ category. I read Laughing Gas  in the ‘book from the library’ category.

French Leave is another possible inclusion as ‘a book set in Europe’. My review and reflections on ‘French Leave’ is reblogged below.

How to take part in the 2016 Wodehouse reading challenge

  • Look at one of the 2016 Reading Challenge lists (try the popular POPSUGAR challenge ).
  • Choose a Wodehouse book to fit one of the categories.
  • Read it if you haven’t already.
  • Reply to the challenge page explaining which book you selected, under which Reading Challenge category.

You don’t have to be actively participating in any other reading challenge to enter.

Happy reading!

HP

Plumtopia

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I recently took a well-thumbed copy of Wodehouse’s French Leave on holiday to Paris, a city famed for its literary connections. P.G. Wodehouse was briefly a resident, and opens the second chapter of French Leave (1956) there:

As the clocks of Paris were striking eleven on a morning three weeks after the Bensonburg expeditionary force had set out for Europe, a tall, willowy, elegant figure dressed in the extreme of fashion, turned the corner of the Rue Belleau and entered the Rue Vanaye. It was Nicholas Jules St Xavier Auguste, Marquis de Maufringneuse et Valerie-Moberanne, affectionately known to his friends, of whom he had many in all walks of life, as Old Nick.

ThisBensonburg expeditionary force’ are three Trent sisters, chicken-farmers from Long Island USA. Having received a modest lump sum, they decide to take a well-earned jaunt to the French resort towns of St. Rocque and Roville. Our…

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2016 Reading Challenge: Laughing Gas (for troubled times)

‘Haven’t you ever heard of Sister Lora Luella Stott?’ ‘No. Who is she?’ ‘She is the woman who is leading California out of the swamp of alcohol.’ ‘Good God!’ I could tell by Eggy’s voice that he was interested. ‘Is there a swamp of alcohol in these parts? What an amazing country America is. Talk …

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Happy New Year: Snifters with Ukridge at the Coal Hole

N.T.P. Murphy identifies the Coal Hole in The Strand (in A Wodehouse Handbook, Volume One ) as one of four remaining London pubs mentioned in Wodehouse’s writing. It is mentioned in ‘The Debut of Battling Billson’, after long-suffering narrator James Corcoran meets Ukridge at the Gaiety Theatre. ‘Hallo, laddie!’ said Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge, genially. ‘When …

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A Damsel in Distress in Chichester

'How's the show going?' 'It's a riot. They think it will run two years in London. As far as I can make it out you don't call it a success in London unless you can take your grandchildren to see the thousandth night.' A Damsel in Distress (1919) To celebrate the recent anniversay of the …

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Wodehouse’s Women: Doctor Sally

As Doctor Sally begins, we meet Sir Hugo Drake, a nerve specialist and keen golfer who is impressed by the sight of a golf ball in flight that plops superbly upon the green of the devilish eighteenth hole. I say impressed. What Wodehouse says is: 'The stout man congealed like one who has seen a vision.' …

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Accountants in Love

He was a chartered accountant, and all chartered accountants have hearts as big as hotels. You think they're engrossed in auditing the half-yearly balance sheets of Miggs, Montagu and Murgatroyd, general importers, and all time they're writing notes to blondes saying "Tomorrow, one-thirty, same place". Ice in the Bedroom (1961) It's typical of this genial …

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