The romances of Bingo Little: Charlotte Corday Rowbotham (by Ken Clevenger)

'Oh, Great Scott!' I said. 'Don't tell me you're in love again.' He seemed aggrieved. 'What do you mean-- again?' 'Well, to my certain knowledge you've been in love with at least half a dozen girls since the spring, and it's only July now. There was that waitress and Honoria Glossop and--' 'Oh, tush! Not …

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More Great Wodehouse Romances: Mrs Spottsworth and Captain Biggar (by Ashok Bhatia)

Plumtopia's annual celebration of the romances of P.G. Wodehouse (to mark the anniversary of the author's death on St Valentine's day 1975) would not be complete without a contribution from Mr Ashok Bhatia. One of the things I particularly enjoy about Mr Bhatia's musings on the subject is his choice of 'seasoned' couples, well beyond the first …

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Money in the Bank (review by John Lagrue)

John Lagrue's timely review of P.G. Wodehouse's Money in the Bank (1942) touches on another great Wodehouse romance --that of Anne Benedick and Jeff Miller. John also proposes Anne Benedick as Wodehouse's finest heroine. It's a proposal worth taking seriously from a Wodehouse lover of John's calibre. I certainly recall Anne being a good egg, but I've never …

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A note on the Psmith-Halliday romance by K.V.K. Murthy

This February's Great Wodehouse romances series continues with another guest author, K.V.K. Murthy, known to Facebook friends as James Joyce.  His piece takes us on a walk through romantic literary history with Psmith and Eve Halliday (Leave it to Psmith). A note on the Psmith-Halliday romance by K.V.K. Murthy The question of favourites is mostly subjective, and …

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When Ginger met Sally

Today’s post continues the Great Wodehouse Romances series, exploring The Adventures of Sally , courtesy of guest author Jon Brierley. If you missed the first instalment, you can catch up here. The Adventures of Sally A Romance (continued...) All caught up? Spiffing. Let us consider our principals. Here comes Sally now – if we take up an …

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The Great Wodehouse Romances: The Adventures of Sally (by Jon Brierley)

Every February Plumtopia celebrates the romances, great and small, in the work of P.G. Wodehouse, to mark the anniversary of his death on St Valentine’s Day, 1975. Guest contributions are warmly welcomed, and this year I’m thrilled to share a series by guest author Jon Brierley on the 1921 Wodehouse novel, The Adventures of Sally. …

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The Great Wodehouse Romances: Archibald’s Benefit

‘Archibald’s Benefit’ (1909) is a delightful short story, included in The Man Upstairs (1914). It relates the trials of Archibald Mealing, a keen but inept golfer, and his romance with Margaret Milsom. I say inept. Wodehouse says: Archibald, mark you, whose golf was a kind of blend of hockey, Swedish drill, and buck-and-wing dancing. For …

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When rozzers in Plumsville fall in love

This year’s delightful Valentine tribute from Mr Ashok Bhatia.

ashokbhatia

Denizens of Plumsville are well aware of the unique traits of their guardians of peace. While tracking down criminals, they spare no effort. It is their upright and proper conduct which upholds the might of the Law. They are invariably meticulous in their approach. When it comes to enforcing the rule of law, it does not matter to them whether the criminal is a human or a canine being. CodeOfTheWoosters

Generally, what they lack in height is more than compensated by their rotundity. A stern gaze and an authoritative demeanor is their hallmark. Their ‘Ho!’s, ‘Ha!’s and snorts often carry a sinister ring, making an ordinary citizen shuffle his feet and feel diffident. To the bold and the beautiful amongst the citizenry, their shining helmets provide an allure which is often irresistible. Unless they have evidence to the contrary, they show due respect to the delicately nurtured.

The rozzers in the…

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The Great Wodehouse Romances: The true romance of PG & Ethel Wodehouse

  Each February at Plumtopia I take a break from my usual pontifications to celebrate some of the ‘Great Romances’ from P.G. Wodehouse’s work, to mark the anniversary of his death on St Valentine’s Day, 1975. This year, I’d like to break with the formula a little by touching on the great romance of Wodehouse’s …

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Attaining Matrimonial Bliss: Some Tips from Bingo Little (Part 1 of 4)

This delightful four-part series from the Inimitable Ashokbhatia explores the ups and downs of married life for Bingo Little and Rosie M Banks — one of my favourite Wodehouse couples. It’s always a pleasure to read Mr Bhatia’s stuff, but he’s really excelled himself this time. Enjoy!

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Present tense, future perfect

Many of us, the residents of Plumsville, are familiar with eligible bachelors and spinsters who dot its magnificent landscape. Their attempts at attracting each other, as well as their romantic rifts, keep us glued to many a narrative. Incurable optimists that we are, we believe that once they have tied the knot, they would live happily ever after. Their present may be tense, but their future would surely be perfect.

But life has this innate tendency to keep them baffled. The harsh slings and arrows of Fate continue to torment them with equal ferocity even after they have sauntered down the aisle with their soul mates and we, the gullible readers, have mistakenly decided to breathe easy.

To PG Wodehouse’s credit, he etches out the struggles of married couples with as much aplomb as he does those of bachelors and spinsters in his narratives.

The curious…

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