P.G. Wodehouse reading list: the Jeeves and Wooster stories

This piece follows my reading suggestions for new Wodehouse readers with a reading list for the Jeeves and Wooster stories. Jeeves and Wooster Reading List The Inimitable Jeeves (1923)* Carry On, Jeeves (1925)* Very Good Jeeves (1930)* Right Ho, Jeeves (1934; US title Brinkley Manor) The Code of the Woosters (1938) Joy in the Morning …

Continue reading P.G. Wodehouse reading list: the Jeeves and Wooster stories

P.G. Wodehouse reading guide

So you'd like to give P.G. Wodehouse a try, but don't know where to start. Or perhaps you've read the Jeeves stories and want to explore Wodehouse's wonderful wider world.  You've come to the right place.

Utopia 500 years (Plumtopia 5)

You may not have noticed, in the hullabaloo of 2016, that this year marked the 500th anniversary of Sir Thomas Moore’s Utopia. As the year draws to a close (and good riddance to it) I wanted to spend a few moments reflecting on Plumtopia, which celebrates a more humble fifth anniversary this year. Sir Thomas …

Continue reading Utopia 500 years (Plumtopia 5)

Highballs for breakfast: The very best of P.G. Wodehouse on the joys of a good stiff drink

Highballs for Breakfast is a new compilation of P.G. Wodehouse’s writing on the subject of liquor, drinking, Dutch Courage and mornings after, compiled and edited by Richard T. Kelly. It’s a well-researched collection that delves widely into the Wodehouse canon, unearthing plenty of treasures on the subject. ‘…Have you ever tasted a mint-julep, Beach?’ ‘Not …

Continue reading Highballs for breakfast: The very best of P.G. Wodehouse on the joys of a good stiff drink

Right Ho, Gaukrodger

Noel Bushnell contemplates what might have been, if Wodehouse had gone to see Lancs v. Worcs instead of Warwickshire play at Cheltenham.

The Traveller

I was basking in the autumn sunshine, mellowing fruitlessly, when an unbidden thought drifted into my cerebellum: what if Jeeves had not been called Jeeves? What if another cricketer’s name had caught P.G. Wodehouse’s ear and the gentleman’s personal gentleman who made his entrance on 18 September 1915 had been called something else? Would Jeeves now be a metaphor for members of the butlerine genus everywhere, or for sources of infallible information on any topic, but most especially in matters of correct dress for all occasions? I mean to say, what?

These be deep waters and, before I stick my toe in, perhaps I should recap the story so far.

It all started when the By The Way newsletter of The P.G. Wodehouse Society (UK) marked the centenary of Jeeves’ premiere with the lengthy and detailed opinion of Wodehouse authority Tony Ring that the un-surnamed Bertie in the first “Jeeves…

View original post 2,123 more words

A day out with the Wiltshire Gudgeons

Last weekend I visited the charming Wiltshire town of Bradford on Avon for a bit of browsing and sluicing with fellow members of the PG Wodehouse Society -- the first, we hope, of many gatherings in the South-West. Our luncheon took place at an outstanding local pub called The Longs Arms and we were unanimous …

Continue reading A day out with the Wiltshire Gudgeons

De-codifying the Code of the Woosters

Hot on the heels of yesterday’s piece on  The Code of Woosters  it seemed fitting to revisit Mr Ashok Bhatia’s five part series on the subject.

 

ashokbhatia

Most of us love Bertram Wilberforce ‘Bertie’ Wooster. Unlike some goofy female characters who would not mind taking ‘a whack at the Wooster millions’, we do not love him for his money. We love him for his self-less attitude and simplicity.CodeOfTheWoosters

Some of us pity him for being ‘mentally negligible’. His tendency to keep getting into one soup or the other often makes us feel superior to him. Whenever he gets stuck, Jeeves rallies around. He keeps pulling him and his pals out of the kind of predicaments they keep facing from time to time. If ever Bertie’s pride gets hurt and he decides to untangle an issue all by himself, disaster lurks around the corner.

All through, Bertie’s actions are governed by The Code of the Woosters which is essentially about never letting a pal down. However, I do believe that there are several finer shades to it. Each…

View original post 1,403 more words

The Code of the Woosters by P.G. Wodehouse: a 20th Century Classic

The Code of the Woosters was one of Stefan Nilsson’s suggestions for including a book by P.G. Wodehouse in your 2016 Reading Challenge – as a 20th Century Classic. A classic it most certainly is, not just in the eyes of Wodehouse readers. The Code of the Woosters frequently pops up in literary lists of …

Continue reading The Code of the Woosters by P.G. Wodehouse: a 20th Century Classic

Eating like P. G. Wodehouse – the ultimate Anatole menu from The Code of the Woosters

If you were lucky enough to receive the gift of Wodehouse this Christmas, you may wish to heed a few words of advice from the author before diving in on a Wodehouse reading binge. In his introduction to The World of Jeeves omnibus (1967), Wodehouse warns against reading too much Bertie and Jeeves in one sitting. Instead he advises taking the stories in measured doses, and prescribes the following menu for a day’s reading:

Breakfast
Toast.
Marmalade.
Coffee.
Soft-boiled egg.
JEEVES AND THE HARD-BOILED EGG.

Luncheon
Hors d’oeuvres.
Cauliflower au gratin
Lamb cutlet.
JEEVES AND THE KID CLEMENTINA.

Dinner
Clear soup.
Halibut.
Chicken en casserole.
Savoury.
JEEVES AND THE OLD SCHOOL CHUM

Before Retiring
Liver pill.
JEEVES AND THE IMPENDING DOOM.

The World of Jeeves (Introduction) 1967

Such willpower does not come easily to us all. If you’re a glutton for food as well as literature, why not extend this feast to include some of Anatole’s mouth-watering dishes? Victoria Madden has applied her schooling in the French language to decipher Anatole’s menu from The Code of the Woosters for our enjoyment.

Happy browsing, and indeed sluicing!

HP

Moulders Lane

After an amusing discussion at Baker’s Daughter blog on food in books and eating the Enid Blyton way, and a prompt from that witty Wodehouse fan the Old Reliable Ashokbhatia, I have polished up my A level French and scoured the internet to bring you this Wodehousian feast. Aficianados will recall it is the menu put together by Bertie in The Code of the Woosters after he anticipates being jugged in lieu of Aunt Dahlia:

‘Bertie! Do you mean this?’

‘I should say so. What’s a mere thirty days in the second division? A bagatelle. I can do it on my head. Let Bassett do his worst. And, ‘ I added in a softer voice, ‘ when my time is up and I come out into the world once more a free man, let Anatole do his best. A month of bread and water or skilly or whatever they…

View original post 579 more words