Six reasons why P.G. Wodehouse is Stephen Fry’s hero

If I were to construct a Plumtopian society according to my own specifications (which, regrettably, nobody has asked me to do) BBC Radio 4 would be one of the first things I'd bung into the package. In addition to producing high quality radio, the Radio 4 website is also well worth exploring. It contains, among …

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School Stories by P.G. Wodehouse

P.G. Wodehouse reading list: the school stories

Admiration for the works of P.G. Wodehouse is not a competitive sport. The merest whiff of appreciation for The Code of The Woosters, one of Wodehouse’s most popular novels, will be sufficient for other Wodehouse fans to scoop you lovingly into the fold. For as Wodehouse once wrote: There is no surer foundation for a …

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Wodehouse adaptations

My recent post on the Centenary of the P.G. Wodehouse novel Piccadilly Jim, prompted some discussion about Wodehouse adaptations. Some people think it impossible and ought not be attempted. I disagree. What the world needs is more and better Wodehouse adaptations. While it's true that some of the linguistic joys of Wodehouse's prose cannot be …

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A Centenary of Piccadilly Jim

The residence of Mr. Peter Pett, the well-known financier, on Riverside Drive, is one of the leading eyesores of that breezy and expensive boulevard. As you pass by in your limousine, or while enjoying ten cents’ worth of fresh air on top of a green omnibus, it jumps out and bites at you. Architects confronted …

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Wodehouse quotes for every occasion: Aunt and Uncle Day

“That was Pongo Twistleton. He’s all broken up about his Uncle Fred." “Dead?” “No such luck. Coming up to London again tomorrow. Pongo had a wire this morning.” P.G. Wodehouse – Uncle Fred Flits By 26 July is Aunt and Uncle Day apparently. The nub of the thing, I gather, is to commemorate the wonderful …

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Where Jeeves meets a hard-boiled detective: P.G. Wodehouse and Raymond Chandler

One prefers, of course, on all occasions to be stainless and above reproach, but, failing that, the next best thing is unquestionably to have got rid of the body. P.G. Wodehouse (Joy in the Morning) Raymond Chandler was born on this day, 23 July 1888. Chandler wrote 'hard-boiled' detective fiction, including classics like The Big …

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How to pronounce Wodehouse

A kindly soul once corrected my pronunciation of P.G. Wodehouse, and I’m profoundly grateful to him for saving me from making a complete ass of myself when I began mixing in Wodehouse Society circles (if only he'd taught me how to use cutlery as well). I had been pronouncing Wodehouse as if it rhymed with …

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The Adventures of Honoria Plum

He was sorry, he wrote, that he would be unable to see Miss Petherick-Soames on the morrow, as they had planned, owing to his unfortunately being called away to Australia. He added that he was pleased to have made her acquaintance and that if, as seemed probable, they never saw each other again, he would …

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Premise for a Screenplay – Jeeves and Wooster updated

An idea by Victoria Madden.

Moulders Lane

Sometimes the hardest part for screen writers is finding the premise – here’s an idea for a Jeeves and Wooster update you might like to have.

 

As readers, dedicated and accidental, of this blog will know, most of my creative output takes the form of writing screenplays. I am never sure how worthwhile it really is to try and pursue this as a writing career as, lets face it, you can’t throw a stirrer in any Los Angeles coffee shop without hitting a screenwriter of some sort.

 

The competition is pretty stiff. And let’s hurriedly gloss over the fact that, even if you were to get your screenplay accepted and paid for, the chances are it will spend years in development before it actually gets made.  If it gets made at all.

The problem is I’m good at it: coming up with plot ideas, scenarios, dialogue and characters…

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Doggerel days

The Old Stepper, that marvellous Australian character, has reported his experience of the recentish Wodehouse Society convention in Washington USA. Thanks old bean!

The Traveller

Now where was I?* Oh yes . . . The Wodehouse Society convention in Washington DC, way back in October . . . hmmm. It was a big couple of days and I’ve tried to capture them in verse, given that’s less typing. My excuse for not expanding on the topic in my usual wordy way is that the doggerel ate my homework.

No really, thank you, the applause is too much . . .

PGW logo

The Stepper Goes to Washington†

What ho, old bean, they brayed
as The Stepper hove into view.
G’day, I grinned, undismayed
amid the Plummy crew.

I’m the boy from Oz, how’re’y’all
doin’ here in Washington?
What, what, what, they said ’n’ all,
just to be clear, what again?

Well, I knew I couldn’t keep this up
for a whole weekend so I reverted
to English and they offered the cup
of kindness usual to the…

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