What P. G. Wodehouse learned from Macbeth

A wonderful piece from the excellent critic, Emsworth, reblogged with his kind permission.

EMSWORTH

It would be a joy to read Wodehouse even if his stories didn’t have more ingenious poetic allusions than there are stars in the sky. On the latest of our many happy passes through The Code of the Woosters — perhaps the very best of the Jeeves and Wooster novels — we started taking inventory.

Wodehouse starts with a taste of Keats on the very first page, as Jeeves tells Bertie Wooster, “There is a fog, sir. If you will recollect, we are now in Autumn — season of mists and mellow fruitfulness.” A few pages later, Sir Watkyn Bassett, a country magistrate who has it in for Bertie, assures Roderick Spode that time in prison won’t prevent a man from “rising on stepping-stones of his dead self to higher things.” That’s from Tennyson’s “In Memoriam.”

Bertie Wooster doesn’t know as much poetry as his friends, so his allusions are…

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One thought on “What P. G. Wodehouse learned from Macbeth

  1. Pingback: There is truly nothing wrong with living in a castle – “Damsel in Distress” by P.G. Wodehouse « Reading Through the BS

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